Individual Authors

From Pride and Prejudice to The Divine Comedy, from Travels With Charley to The Life Of Oscar Wilde, we can help you find the individual authors books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.

Top Sellers in Individual Authors

Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice

by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice is the second novel by English author Jane Austen, after Sense and Sensibility. First published on 28 January 1813, Austen sold the copyright for just £110.  Its manuscript was initially written between 1796 and 1797 in Steventon, Hampshire, where Austen lived in the rectory. Originally called First Impressions, it was never published under that title, and in following revisions it was retitled Pride and Prejudice. It was first published anonymously. A... Read more about this item
It

It

by Stephen King

IT weaves a supernatural tale of seven socially outcast kids who find themselves brought together one summer to battle an ancient and deadly shape-shifter known as IT. IT emerges from the sewers once every 27 years, using it's polymorphic abilities to terrify and prey upon children in the rural town of Derry, Maine - often in the form of the demonic Pennywise the Clown. IT was made into a television mini-series in 1990, starring Tim Curry and more recently as a blockbuster film (2017).
A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol

by Charles Dickens

The full title of Charles Dickens' most famous work is technically A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost-Story of Christmas. This novella was published on December 19, 1843, and the first edition run of 6000 copies were sold out by Christmas Eve of that year. The publication of the first edition was fraught with complications, and even though the book was received to positive reviews, profits of the book fell far below Dickens' expectations, and the financial strain caused rifts between Dickens and... Read more about this item
The Old Man and The Sea

The Old Man and The Sea

by Ernest Hemingway

This novella, only 140 pages, was first
printed in its entirety in Life Magazine on September 1, 1952. It inspired a buying frenzy - selling over five million copies of the
magazine in just two days!
The story about an aging Cuban
fisherman wrangling a large marlin in the gulf stream was written in
1951 in Cuba and published in 1952. In 1953, it won the Pulitzer Prize
for Fiction and led to Hemingway's nomination for the Nobel Prize in
Literature in 1954.
Man's struggle against nature is the... Read more about this item
The Grapes Of Wrath

The Grapes Of Wrath

by John Steinbeck

John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath
stands as a pivotal piece of American literature. The story follows
the Joad family (and thousands of others) as they are driven from the
Oklahoma farm where they are sharecroppers during the Great
Depression. The drought, economic hardship, and changes in financial
and agricultural industries send them searching for dignity and
honest work in the bountiful state of California.


The novel earned Steinbeck the Pulitzer
Prize for fiction in 1940, and inspired the... Read more about this item
Ulysses

Ulysses

by James Joyce

Ulysses is a modernist novel by James Joyce. It was first
serialized in The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920 and later
published by Shakespeare and Company in 1922. Originally, Joyce conceived of
Ulysses as a short story to be included in Dubliners, but decided instead to
publish it as a long novel, situated as a sort of sequel to A Portrait of the
Artist as a Young Man, picking up Stephen Dedalus’s life over a year later.
Ulysses takes place on a single day, June 16, 1904, in Dublin -... Read more about this item
The Stand

The Stand

by Stephen King

A deadly virus, accidentally released from a government lab, wipes out most of the world's population. The survivors are left to rebuild society, but two factions emerge - one led by a kind-hearted woman named Mother Abagail and the other by a demonic figure known as Randall Flagg. The two sides ultimately face off in a battle between good and evil. The book explores themes of humanity, morality, and the consequences of our actions.  King's intricate character development and immersive storytelling... Read more about this item
The Odyssey

The Odyssey

by Homer

Listen, O Muse, and hear my song, Of the great adventures that took so long, Of the noble Odysseus, king of Ithaca, Whose journey was filled with many a setback.The tale begins with the end of the Trojan War, When the Greeks set sail from the Trojan shore. Odysseus and his men faced many a danger, From the wrath of the gods to the Cyclops' anger.They sailed through storms and fought with beasts, But despite all odds, they made it to their feast, And there, in the halls of the goddess Circe, Odysseus... Read more about this item
Of Mice and Men

Of Mice and Men

by John Steinbeck

Of Mice and Men is a novella written by Nobel Prize-winning author John Steinbeck. Published in 1937, it tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced migrant ranch workers during the Great Depression in California.An intimate portrait of two men who cherish the slim bond between them and the dream they share in a world marred by petty tyranny, misunderstanding, jealousy, and callousness. Clinging to each other in their loneliness and alienation, George and his simple-minded... Read more about this item
East Of Eden

East Of Eden

by John Steinbeck

East of Eden is a novel by John Steinbeck, published in 1952. It tells the multi-generational story of two families, the Hamiltons and the Trasks, in California's Salinas Valley. The novel explores themes of good and evil, love and hate, and the human capacity for both. It also delves into the nature of family dynamics, inheritance, and the American dream. The characters are complex and nuanced, and the novel's narrative structure allows for a deep exploration of their motivations and emotions. East of... Read more about this item
The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

by Mark Twain

Commonly named among the Great American novels, The Adventures of
Huckleberry Finn, written by Mark Twain, is generally regarded as the
sequel to his earlier novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; however, in
Huckleberry Finn, Twain focused increasingly on the institution of
slavery and the South. Narrated by Huckleberry “Huck” Finn in Southern
antebellum vernacular, the novel gives vivid descriptions of people and
daily life along the Mississippi River while following the adventure of
Huck and... Read more about this item
The Shining

The Shining

by Stephen King

Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. Among his most recent are 11/22/63; Full Dark, No Stars; Under the Dome; Just After Sunset; Duma Key; Lisey’s Story; Cell; and the concluding novels in the Dark Tower saga: Wolves of the Calla, Song of Susannah, and The Dark Tower. His acclaimed nonfiction book, On Writing, is also a bestseller. He was the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, and in... Read more about this item
Treasure Island

Treasure Island

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Robert Louis Stevenson. The story was originally serialised in the children's magazine Young Folks under the title The Sea Cook over a period of several months from 1881-82.Traditionally considered a coming-of-age story, Treasure Island is the classic pirate tale, known for its superb atmosphere, character and action. It is one of the most frequently dramatised of all novels. The influence of Treasure Island on popular perception of... Read more about this item
A Tale Of Two Cities

A Tale Of Two Cities

by Charles Dickens

Written by Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities is a historical novel that follows Manette, a French doctor imprisoned for 18 long years in Paris’s Bastille. Following his release, he goes to live in London with his daughter Lucie, who had never met him and believed him to be dead. Set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution and Reign of Terror, A Tale of Two Cities is a fictitious story that falls both into the historical and adventure genres. The famous book is one of the... Read more about this item
On Writing

On Writing

by Stephen King

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft is an autobiography and writing guide by Stephen King, published in 2000. It is a book about the prolific author's experiences as a writer. Although he discusses several of his books, one doesn't need to have read them or even be familiar with them to read On Writing. In 2008, Entertainment Weekly listed On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft 21st on their list of The New Classics: Books - The 100 best reads from 1983 to 2008, making it King's only entry.
For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls

by Ernest Hemingway

Many consider For Whom the Bell Tolls to be author Ernest Hemingway’s finest work. Inspired by Hemingway’s time as a war correspondent for The North American Newspaper Alliance during the Spanish Civil War, For Whom the Bell Tolls is a stark and brutal commentary on the nature of war, sacrifice, and death. In fact, many believe his work is among the best depictions of the Spanish Civil War written. As with some of Hemingway’s other work, many of the characters, experiences, and... Read more about this item
Sun Also Rises

Sun Also Rises

by Ernest Hemingway

Based on real events and acquaintances of Hemingway, Sun Also Rises is about American and English expats in Pamplona.
Great Expectations

Great Expectations

by Charles Dickens

Great Expectations is a classic novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1861. It tells the story of Pip, a young orphan boy brought up by his abusive sister and her blacksmith husband in rural England. Pip dreams of becoming a gentleman and escaping poverty, but his life takes a dramatic turn when he receives a large fortune from an anonymous benefactor. As he rises in society, he becomes involved with a host of colorful characters, including the eccentric Miss Havisham and her adopted daughter Estella,... Read more about this item
A Farewell To Arms

A Farewell To Arms

by Ernest Hemingway

Set during World War 1, Ernest Hemingway’s A
Farewell to Arms is the story of Lieutenant Frederic Henry, an American serving
as an ambulance driver in the Italian army, and his love affair with an English
nurse named Catherine Barkley. The novel is semi-autobiographical, based on
Hemingway's own experiences serving in the Italian campaigns during the war.
While some assume the title of the work to be taken from a poem by 16th century
English dramatist George Peele, others believe it to be a simple pun... Read more about this item
Hamlet

Hamlet

by William Shakespeare

In this quintessential Shakespearean drama, Hamlets halting pursuit of revenge for his fathers death unfolds in a series of highly charged confrontations that climax in tragedy.   The play begins with the ghost of Hamlet's father revealing that he was killed by Hamlet's uncle, Claudius, who has now married Hamlet's mother, Gertrude. Consumed by grief and madness, Hamlet feigns insanity as he plots his revenge. His inner turmoil and moral dilemmas are explored through soliloquies, while the play... Read more about this item
Macbeth

Macbeth

by William Shakespeare

Macbeth by William Shakespeare is a tragic play that delves into the destructive consequences of unchecked ambition. The story follows Macbeth, a Scottish nobleman, who, driven by his wife's relentless ambition and the prophecies of three witches, succumbs to his own inner darkness. As he ascends to the throne through deceit, Macbeth becomes consumed by guilt and paranoia. The play explores themes of power, guilt, fate, and the corrupting nature of ambition. Through vivid imagery, complex characters, and... Read more about this item
A Moveable Feast

A Moveable Feast

by Ernest Hemingway

A Moveable Feast is a set of memoirs by American author Ernest Hemingway about his years in Paris as part of the American expatriate circle of writers in the 1920s. In addition to painting a picture of Hemingway's time as a struggling young writer, the book also sketches the story of Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley. Published after his death, A Moveable Feast is considered by many to contain some of his best writing.
Iliad

Iliad

by Homer

Dating to the ninth century BC, Homer’s timeless poem still vividly conveys the horror and heroism of men and gods wrestling with towering emotions and battling amidst devastation and destruction, as it moves inexorably to  the wrenching, tragic conclusion of the Trojan War. Renowned classicist Bernard Knox observes in his superb Introduction that although the violence of the Iliad is grim and relentless, it coexists with both images of civilized life and a poignant yearning for peace.... Read more about this item
The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer

The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer

by Mark Twain

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, is a popular 1876 novel about a young boy growing up in the antebellum South on the Mississippi River in the town of St. Petersberg, based on the town of Hannibal, Missouri.
The Divine Comedy

The Divine Comedy

by Dante Alighieri

Dante Alighieri was born in 1265. Considered Italy's greatest poet, this scion of a Florentine family mastered in the art of lyric poetry at an early age. His first major work is La Vita Nuova (1292) which is a tribute to Beatrice Portinari, the great love of his life. Married to Gemma Donatic, Dante's political activism resulted in his being exiled from Florence to eventually settle in Ravenna. It is believed that The Divine Comedy—comprised of three canticles, The Inferno, The Purgatorio, and... Read more about this item

Individual Authors Books & Ephemera

Travels With Charley

Travels With Charley

by Steinbeck, John

Travels with Charley: In Search of America is a travelogue by American author John Steinbeck. It documents the road trip he took with his French standard poodle Charley around the United States, in 1960. He wrote that he was moved by a desire to see his country on a personal level, since he made his living writing about it.
Cannery Row

Cannery Row

by Steinbeck, John

Cannery Row is the waterfront street in the New Monterey section of Monterey, California, USA. It is the site of a number of now-defunct sardine canning factories. The street name, formerly a nickname for Ocean View Avenue, became official in January 1958 to honor John Steinbeck and his famous novel Cannery Row.
Plain Tales From the Hills

Plain Tales From the Hills

by Kipling, Rudyard

Originally written for the Lahore Civil and Military Gazette, the stories were intended for a provincial readership familiar with the pleasures and miseries of colonial life. For the subsequent English edition, Kipling revised the tales so as to recreate as vividly as possible the sights and smells of India for those at home. Yet far from being a celebration of Empire, Kipling's stories tell of 'heat and bewilderment and wasted effort and broken faith'. He writes brilliantly and hauntingly about the... Read more about this item
De Profundis

De Profundis

by Wilde, Oscar

Oscar Wilde wrote this while in prison to his friend and lover Lord Alfred Douglas. This love letter is a profound look into the personal life of Oscar. Please Note: This book has been reformatted to be easy to read in true text, not scanned images that can sometimes be difficult to decipher. The Microsoft eBook has a contents page linked to the chapter headings for easy navigation. The Adobe eBook has bookmarks at chapter headings and is printable up to two full copies per year. Both versions... Read more about this item
Tortilla Flat

Tortilla Flat

by Steinbeck, John

Tortilla Flat (1935) is an early Steinbeck novel set in Monterey, California. The book portrays with great sympathy and humour a group of paisanos (fellows/countrymen), denouncing society by enjoying life and wine in the idyllic days after the end of the Great War and preceding U.S. prohibition. Tortilla Flat was made into a film in 1942. Steinbeck would later return to the some of the panhandling locals of Monterey (though not the Spanish paisanos of the Flat) in his novel Cannery Row (1945).
The Moon Is Down

The Moon Is Down

by Steinbeck, John

In this masterful tale set in Norway during World War II, Steinbeck explores the effects of invasion on both the conquered and the conquerors. As he delves into the emotions of the German commander and the Norwegian traitor, and depicts the spirited patriotism of the Norwegian underground, Steinbeck uncovers profound, often unsettling truths about war—and about human nature. Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck’s self-described “celebration of the durability of democracy”... Read more about this item
The Wayward Bus

The Wayward Bus

by Steinbeck, John

Today, nearly forty years after his death, Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck remains one of America's greatest writers and cultural figures. Over the next year, his many works, beginning with the six shown here, will be published as black-spine Penguin Classics for the first time and will feature eye-catching, newly commissioned art.Of this initial group of six titles, The Wayward Bus is in a new edition. An imaginative and unsentimental chronicle of a bus traveling California's back roads. This... Read more about this item
Cup Of Gold

Cup Of Gold

by Steinbeck, John

A STANDOUT in the Steinbeck canon, Cup of Gold is edgy and adventurous, brash and distrustful of society, and sure to add a new dimension to the common perception of this all-American writer. Steinbeck's first novel and sole work of historical fiction contains themes that resonate throughout the author's prodigious body of work. From the mid-1650s through the 1660s, Henry Morgan, a pirate and outlaw of legendary viciousness, ruled the Spanish Main. He ravaged the coasts of Cuba and America, striking... Read more about this item
The Long Valley

The Long Valley

by Steinbeck, John

First published in 1938, this volume of stories collected with the encouragement of his longtime editor Pascal Covici serves as a wonderful introduction to the work of Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck. Set in the beautiful Salinas Valley of California, where simple people farm the land and struggle to find a place for themselves in the world, these stories reflect Steinbeck’s characteristic interests: the tensions between town and country, laborers and owners, past and present. Included here... Read more about this item
The Winter Of Our Discontent

The Winter Of Our Discontent

by Steinbeck, John

The Winter of Our Discontent published in 1961, is John Steinbeck's last novel. The title is a reference to the line "Now is the winter of our discontent made glorious summer by this son [or sun] of York," from William Shakespeare's Richard III.
The Adventures Of Oliver Twist

The Adventures Of Oliver Twist

by Dickens, Charles

The Adventures of Oliver Twist is the second novel by
English author Charles Dickens. The book was initially published serially from
February 1837 through April 1839 in Bentley’s Miscellany, a periodical edited
by Dickens. In the classic rags-to-riches story, the orphan and escapee Oliver
Twist must find his way through the criminal-filled streets of London. 
The Steinbeck Omnibus

The Steinbeck Omnibus

by Steinbeck, John

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde

by Harris, Frank

The Life Of Oscar Wilde

The Life Of Oscar Wilde

by Pearson, Hesketh