Irish Fiction

From Ulysses to The Master, from The Barracks to That They May Face the Rising Sun, we can help you find the irish fiction books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.

Top Sellers in Irish Fiction

Ulysses

Ulysses

by James Joyce

Ulysses is a modernist novel by James Joyce. It was first
serialized in The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920 and later
published by Shakespeare and Company in 1922. Originally, Joyce conceived of
Ulysses as a short story to be included in Dubliners, but decided instead to
publish it as a long novel, situated as a sort of sequel to A Portrait of the
Artist as a Young Man, picking up Stephen Dedalus’s life over a year later.
Ulysses takes place on a single day, June 16, 1904, in Dublin -... Read more about this item
Finnegans Wake

Finnegans Wake

by James Joyce

Finnegans Wake is a work of comic fiction by Irish author James Joyce, significant for an experimental style and its resulting reputation as one of the most difficult works of fiction in the English language. Written in Paris over a period of 17 years, and published in 1939, two years before the author's death, Finnegans Wake was Joyce's final work. -
Dubliners

Dubliners

by James Joyce

Dubliners is a collection of 15 short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914. The fifteen stories were meant to be a naturalistic depiction of the Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written at the time when Irish nationalism was at its peak, and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences.
A Portrait Of the Artist As a Young Man

A Portrait Of the Artist As a Young Man

by James Joyce

Joyce's A Portait of the Artist as a Young Man is a semi-autobiographical work. It tells of the intellectual, religious, and philosophical awakening of the main character, Stephen Dedalus as he rebels against the conventions in which he has been raised and leaves home to pursue his artistic ambition.
The Third Policeman

The Third Policeman

by Flann O'Brien

The Third Policeman is a novel by Irish author Brian O'Nolan, writing under the pseudonym Flann O'Brien. It was written between 1939 and 1940, but after it initially failed to find a publisher, the author withdrew the manuscript from circulation and claimed he had lost it. At the time of his death in 1966, the book was still unpublished. It was finally published in 1967 by McGibbon & Kee.
The Sea

The Sea

by John Banville

John Banville is an Irish novelist and screenwriter born in 1945. He sometimes writes under the pseudonym Benjamin Black. His eighteenth novel, The Sea, won the Man Booker Prize in 2005. Banville is known for the dark humor of his arch narrators and his cold, inventive prose style.
In this novel, Banville's main character is Max Morden, an art historian, who has recently suffered the demise of his beloved wife Anna. It is a journey back down the earliest roadways and alleys of Max's memory. Intertwined... Read more about this item
Brooklyn

Brooklyn

by Colm Toibin

Colm Tóibín’s most recent novel, The Master, won the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, Le prix du meilleur livre étranger, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. His other books of fiction include The Story of the Night, The Blackwater Lightship, a finalist for the Man Booker Prize and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, and the short fiction collection Mothers and Sons. Tóibín was one of the 2008 Scotiabank... Read more about this item
The Secret Scripture

The Secret Scripture

by Sebastian Barry

An epic story of family, love, and unavoidable tragedy from the two-time Man Booker Prize finalist Sebastian Barry 's novels have been hugely admired by readers and critics, and in 2005 his novel A Long Long Way was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. In The Secret Scripture, Barry revisits County Sligo, Ireland, the setting for his previous three books, to tell the unforgettable story of Roseanne McNulty. Once one of the most beguiling women in Sligo, she is now a resident of Roscommon Regional Mental... Read more about this item
Star Of the Sea, The

Star Of the Sea, The

by Joseph O'Connor

Star of the Sea is a historical novel by the Irish writer Joseph O'Connor published in 2004. The novel is set in 1847 against the backdrop of the Irish famine. The "Star of the Sea" of the title is a famine ship, making the journey from Ireland to New York. Aboard are hundreds of refugees, most of them with humble and desperate backgrounds.
A Long Long Way

A Long Long Way

by Sebastian Barry

A Long Long Way is a novel by Irish author Sebastian Barry set during the First World War. The protagonist Willie Dunne leaves Dublin to fight for the Allies as a member of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He is caught between the war playing out on foreign fields and that festering at home, waiting to erupt with the Easter Rising. The novel was short listed for the Booker Prize in 2005. In a 2009 National Public Radio interview, author R.L.
The Whereabouts Of Eneas McNulty

The Whereabouts Of Eneas McNulty

by Sebastian Barry

Hailed by the San Francisco Chronicle as "the finest book to come out of Europe this year," The Whereabouts of Eneas McNulty is acclaimed Irish playwright Sebastian Barry's lyrical tale of a fugitive everyman. For Eneas McNulty, a happy, innocent childhood in County Sligo in the early 1900s gives way to an Ireland wracked by violence and conflict. Unable to find work in the depressed times after World War I, Eneas joins the British-led police force, the Royal Irish Constabulary—a decision that... Read more about this item
Paddy Clarke, Ha Ha Ha

Paddy Clarke, Ha Ha Ha

by Roddy Doyle

Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha (1993) is a novel by Irish writer Roddy Doyle. It won the Booker Prize in 1993. The story is about a 10 year old boy and events that happen within his age group. He also has to cope with his parents' deteriorating relationship. The novel is known for its interesting use of language – Doyle uses a register that gives the reader the vivid impression of listening to the memories of a ten-year-old Irish boy from the 1960s.
The Gathering

The Gathering

by Anne Enright

Anne Enright is a 2007 Booker Prize-winning Irish author. She has written essays, short-stories, non-fiction and novels. This story, The Gathering, is the narrative voice of Veronica, who is one of twelve grown-up children in the Hegarty family; it discusses the apparent suicide of her younger brother Liam, and the effect it has on her and the family. The novel is a strong and poignant portrayal of loss and alienation. Enright captures the peculiar relationship of these close siblings perfectly.
 
The Woman Who Walked Into Doors

The Woman Who Walked Into Doors

by Roddy Doyle

Paula Spencer is a thirty-nine-year-old working-class woman struggling to reclaim her dignity after marriage to an abusive husband and a worsening drinking problem. Paula recalls her contented childhood, the audacity she learned as a teenager, the exhilaration of her romance with Charlo, and the marriage to him that left her feeling powerless. Capturing both her vulnerability and her strength, Roddy Doyle gives Paula a voice that is real and unforgettable.
A Star Called Henry

A Star Called Henry

by Roddy Doyle

A Star Called Henry (1999) is a novel by Irish writer Roddy Doyle. It is Vol. 1 of The Last Roundup series. The second installment of the series, Oh, Play That Thing, was published in 2004.
Ireland

Ireland

by Frank Delaney

In the winter of 1951, a storyteller arrives at the home of nine-year-old Ronan O'Mara in the Irish countryside. The last practitioner of an honored, centuries-old tradition, the Seanchai enthralls his assembled audience for three evenings running with narratives of foolish kings and fabled saints, of enduring accomplishments and selfless acts -- until he is banished from the household for blasphemy and moves on. But these three incomparable nights have changed young Ronan forever, setting him on the... Read more about this item
A Goat's Song

A Goat's Song

by Dermot Healy

An Irish playwright reimagines his estranged lover’s past in this “rare and powerful book”(E. Annie Proulx) whose “melancholy beauty resonates with the deepest truths” (Boston Globe).
The Story Of Lucy Gault

The Story Of Lucy Gault

by William Trevor

The stunning new novel from highly acclaimed author William Trevor is a brilliant, subtle, and moving story of love, guilt, and forgiveness. The Gault family leads a life of privilege in early 1920s Ireland, but the threat of violence leads the parents of nine-year-old Lucy to decide to leave for England, her mother's home. Lucy cannot bear the thought of leaving Lahardane, their country house with its beautiful land and nearby beach, and a dog she has befriended. On the day before they are to leave,... Read more about this item
Reading In the Dark

Reading In the Dark

by Seamus Deane

Reading in the Dark is a novel written by Seamus Deane in 1996. The novel is set in Derry, Northern Ireland and spans more than twenty-five years (February 1945 through July 1971).
Molloy

Molloy

by Samuel Beckett

Butcher Boy

Butcher Boy

by Patrick McCabe

The Book Of Evidence

The Book Of Evidence

by John Banville

The Country Girls

The Country Girls

by Edna O'Brien

The Master

The Master

by Colm Toibin

Irish Fiction Books & Ephemera

The Barracks

The Barracks

by McGahern, John

Elizabeth Reegan, after years of freedom and loneliness marries into the enclosed Irish village of her upbringing. The children are not her own; her husband is straining to break free from the servile security of the police force; and her own life, threatened by illness, seems to be losing the last vestiges of its purpose. Moving between tragedy and savage comedy, desperation and joy, John McGaherns first novel is one of haunting power.
The Blackwater Lightship

The Blackwater Lightship

by Toibin, Colm

The Blackwater Lightship is a 1999 novel written by Irish novelist Colm Tóibín, and was short-listed for the Booker Prize.
Fools Of Fortune

Fools Of Fortune

by Trevor, William

Penguin Classics is proud to welcome William Trevor—"Ireland’s answer to Chekhov" (The Boston Globe) and "one of the best writers of our era" (The Washington Post)—to our distinguished list of literary masters. In this award-winning novel, an informer’s body is found on the estate of a wealthy Irish family shortly after the First World War, and an appalling cycle of revenge is set in motion. Led by a zealous sergeant, the Black and Tans set fire to the family home, and only young... Read more about this item
Father\'s Music

Father's Music

by Bolger, Dermot

Exiles

Exiles

by Joyce, James

Down By the River

Down By the River

by O'Brien, Edna

A Season To Remember

A Season To Remember

by O'Flanagan, Sheila

The Best Of Myles

The Best Of Myles

by O'Brien, Flann